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The Eurasier

The Eurasier is a Spitz type dog that originated in Germany in 1960, developed by crossing Chow Chows with German Wolfsspitz. Later, the Samoyed was also added to improve character, appearance and health. In 1973, the breed was renamed Eurasier and was recognized by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale. The breed was intended to have the natural, "northern" look of the Spitz dog, but with a more calm demeanour to make it more suitable to family life.

Temperament

The Eurasier should be calm and even tempered, but with enough energy to participate in activities with its family. The Eurasier can be reserved with people that it does not know, however this means that the Eurasier is not particularly interested in interacting with strangers. It should never be fearful or aggressive. Because of this natural tendency, it is important that the Eurasier receives appropriate socialization from a young age. As the Eurasier matures, their self-assuredness, confidence and tolerance emerges. To outsiders, a well-socialized Eurasier will appear serious, dignified and calm.

With family and those the Eurasier considers to be good friends, they are affectionate, playful and intuitive, and will reveal their true clownish natures. Eurasiers tend to be very well attuned to their owner's emotions, with many reporting that their Eurasier seems to sense when the owner is upset or unwell. The Eurasier always wants to be near their owner, usually sleeping nearby and following from room to room, though not all are particularly cuddly. It is important to train the Eurasier to tolerate being along from a young age, otherwise they may become prone to separation anxiety. The Eurasier requires an owner who is able to be with their dog the majority of the time, as constant close contact with their family is necessary for developing all the best personality traits of the Eurasier. Once old enough, they are fine to leave at home, however they shouldn't be left alone for extended periods of time on a regular basis.

Health

The Eurasier is generally a healthy breed, with very few serious health problems. The average lifespan is usually 12-14 years, however 15 and older is not uncommon. In order to maintain robust health in the breed, it is important to screen breeding dogs for testable conditions, research pedigrees and ancestral health data, and make breeding choices with diversity in mind. The most common conditions that can be tested for are summarized below.

Hip Dysplasia

An irregular development of the hip joint, causing degenerative joint changes and arthritis.

OFA hip x-ray screening is used to evaluate the hip conformation of a potential breeding dog. Generally, only dogs with passing scores should be bred.

Hypothyroidism

An auto-immune condition leading to the destruction of the thyroid gland. Affected dogs will gain weight, have a poor coat and lack energy.

In the Eurasier, the thyroid should be evaluated annually or prior to breeding, as the thyroid values can change. Thyroid function can be screened by OFA, Hemopet, MSU or Idexx.

Elbow Dysplasia

An irregular development of the elbow joint, causing degenerative joint changes and arthritis.

OFA elbow x-ray screening is used to evaluate the elbow conformation of a potential breeding dog. Generally, only dogs with passing scores should be bred.

Inherited Eye Conditions

Heritable eye conditions including distichiasis, entropion and ectropion are known to occur in the Eurasier breed.

Distichiasis is the presence of additional or abnormally placed eyelashes. Generally these do not cause problems for the dog, but severely affected dogs should not be bred.

Entropion and ectropion are disorders of the eyelids that disqualify a dog from breeding.

Patellar Luxation

An irregular development of the knee joint, causing lameness and arthritis.

OFA patella screening is used to evaluate the knee joint of a potential breeding dog. Generally, only dogs with passing scores should be bred.

Other Conditions

​Conditions where genetic tests are available:

  • Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation 

 

Less common conditions traceable through pedigree analysis:

  • Bloat

  • Diabetes

  • Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency

  • Glaucoma